Superfood Spotlight: Flax Seeds

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Flax seeds have been cultivated for consumption for close to 6000 years. There are so many health benefits of these tiny seeds – they should be a pantry staple. The good news, they’re not expensive, and they are readily available in most grocery stores.

Here are my top 3 reasons that I recommend all of my clients consume 1 TBSP of ground flax seed every day:

  1. Flax seeds are high in Omega 3’s, specifically ALA, which is essential for health maintenance and disease prevention The ALA in flaxseed has found to be stable for at least 3 hours of cooking at oven temperatures (approximately 300F), which makes it available after ground flaxseeds have been added to baked goods.
  1. Flax seeds are high in soluble fiber. The soluble fiber traps fat and cholesterol in the digestive system so that it unable to be absorbed. Also, flax is extremely high in both insoluble fiber which can support colon detoxification, fat loss and reduce sugar cravings.
  2. Flax seeds are high in lingans. Flaxseeds are the richest source of plant lignans, having about 8 times the lignan content of sesame seeds [note that flaxseed oil does not contain lignans – they bind to the fiber]. The other plant foods on the list have about one-tenth or less the amount of lignans as sesame seeds per serving.

The three lignans found in flaxseeds can be converted by intestinal bacteria into enterolactone  and enterodiol which            naturally balance hormones which may be the reason flax seeds reduce the risk of breast cancer.

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that the lignans in flaxseeds may also reduce the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer.

**In addition, flaxseed is a good source of iron, zinc, calcium, protein, potassium, magnesium, vitamin E, and folate.

Ground flaxseed provides more nutritional benefits than does whole flaxseed. That’s because the seeds are very hard, making them difficult to crack, even with careful chewing. Grinding breaks the seeds up, making them easier to digest when eaten. If whole flax seeds remain unbroken, they may pass undigested through the body.

You can add the ground flaxseed to your morning oatmeal or other cereal. I blend 1 TBSP of ground flaxseed into a green smoothie each morning. You can also add them to muffins, bread and cookie recipes

Eat Healthy & Thrive

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